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whatever, dudes!!

I decided I wanted life to have some mystery.

Posts tagged science!

Apr 7 '14

skunkbear:

Yesterday there was some big news in the world of physics - scientists detected evidence of “cosmic inflation” - the first exciting moments of the Big Bang. 

Cosmic inflation was first described by Andrei Linde and his colleagues in 1983. The new evidence — called the “Holy Grail” and “missing link” of cosmology” —vindicates Linde’s work. Stanford University shared this video of Linde hearing the news:

Chao-Lin Kuo, one of the physicists behind the new discovery, surprised Linde at his home.

"Renata [Linde’s wife] tells me, ‘It’s probably a delivery - did you order anything?’" Linde said. "Yeah — I ordered it 30 years ago and it finally arrived."

Mar 29 '14
forlackofabettercomic:

Nothing spices up your love life like the scientific method!

forlackofabettercomic:

Nothing spices up your love life like the scientific method!

Mar 18 '14

kenobi-wan-obi:

bouncingdodecahedrons:

Carl telling us how (not) to science.

"conclusion: dinosaurs" is still my favorite rebuttal to just about anything tbh.

Feb 19 '14

geekymerch:

These awesome science and math inspired cutting boards can be found at Elysium Woodworks!

Jan 31 '14

tastefullyoffensive:

Science Penguin [x]

Nov 2 '13

gallium-knight:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

mermaidsandmisandry:

“some scientists agree”. what does that mean. some scientists. that could be two scientists. two scientists agree. two agreeable scientists isnt very credible. do it again. more scientists.

image

this is my favorite post

(Source: mermaidsandmistletoe-archive)

Nov 1 '13
sciencesoup:


What’s the password?
Superb Fairy-Wrens (Malurus cyaneus) from southeastern Australia are often exploited by the Horsfield’s bronze-cuckoo (Chalcites basalis), who lay their eggs in a fairy-wren’s nest to pass on parenting duties to unwitting foster parents. In most species, this intrusion is either sorted out before the cuckoo eggs hatch, with the parents recognising and ejecting the eggs, or parents are just resigned to feeding the chick anyway. But in 2003, Naomi Langmore found that fairy-wrens will abandon 40% of nests with a Horsfield bronze-cuckoo chick in it, which means that somehow, they can recognise the intruders. By keeping nests under constant audio surveillance, Diane Colombelli-Negrel from Flinders University found out how they do it: a very neat evolutionary trick. Starting about nine days into the eggs’ 14-day incubation, the mother wren sings a two-second tune to them every four minutes. This tune contains a unique note that’s literally a password—when the eggs hatch a week later, the chicks do what’s natural: beg for food. Their call contains this special note, and the parents know it’s their chick. Colombelli-Negrel found that if she swapped eggs early in the incubation period, the hatched chicks’ calls matched their foster parents’ calls, not their biological parents, suggesting that this isn’t an innate ability—it’s something they learn. Cuckoo eggs are usually dropped into a fairy-wren nest late in the incubation period, so when they hatch, cuckoo chicks haven’t learnt the password. The parents realise something is wrong, and as a Langmore found, 40% of the time they abandon the nest and go make a fresh start at a family elsewhere. It isn’t a clear win for the wrens—maybe they’re getting worse at recognising the signature note, or maybe cuckoos are getting better at mimicking. Either way, it’s a pretty interesting adaptation in the long-running battle of the birds.

sciencesoup:

What’s the password?

Superb Fairy-Wrens (Malurus cyaneus) from southeastern Australia are often exploited by the Horsfield’s bronze-cuckoo (Chalcites basalis), who lay their eggs in a fairy-wren’s nest to pass on parenting duties to unwitting foster parents. In most species, this intrusion is either sorted out before the cuckoo eggs hatch, with the parents recognising and ejecting the eggs, or parents are just resigned to feeding the chick anyway. But in 2003, Naomi Langmore found that fairy-wrens will abandon 40% of nests with a Horsfield bronze-cuckoo chick in it, which means that somehow, they can recognise the intruders. By keeping nests under constant audio surveillance, Diane Colombelli-Negrel from Flinders University found out how they do it: a very neat evolutionary trick. Starting about nine days into the eggs’ 14-day incubation, the mother wren sings a two-second tune to them every four minutes. This tune contains a unique note that’s literally a password—when the eggs hatch a week later, the chicks do what’s natural: beg for food. Their call contains this special note, and the parents know it’s their chick. Colombelli-Negrel found that if she swapped eggs early in the incubation period, the hatched chicks’ calls matched their foster parents’ calls, not their biological parents, suggesting that this isn’t an innate ability—it’s something they learn. Cuckoo eggs are usually dropped into a fairy-wren nest late in the incubation period, so when they hatch, cuckoo chicks haven’t learnt the password. The parents realise something is wrong, and as a Langmore found, 40% of the time they abandon the nest and go make a fresh start at a family elsewhere. It isn’t a clear win for the wrens—maybe they’re getting worse at recognising the signature note, or maybe cuckoos are getting better at mimicking. Either way, it’s a pretty interesting adaptation in the long-running battle of the birds.

Jun 16 '13
mucholderthen:

ANOMALOCARIDS  [Anomalocaridids]Art and essay by John Meszaros
Anomalocarids are a group of (usually) predaceous arthropods found primarily in fossil beds of the Cambrian period.  
As more and more fossils are unearthed, the diversity of anomalocarids becomes increasingly clear.  
Some were the apex predator of their time, 
others gentle plankton-skimmers, 
some impaled actively swimming prey in the open water, 
others probed for worms in the mud.
There are, however, a few features that unite them all:
GREAT APPENDAGES: Anomalocarids possessed a pair of spiny, multi-jointed feeding appendages on the front of the head. There is considerable variation in size and structure of these limbs among the various species. For instance, the “classic” anomalocarid, A. canadensis (the one people usually think of when they picture anomalocarids) had long, robust limbs with multi-pronged spines for capturing prey. Laggania cambria, on the other hand, had stubbier appendages with long, delicate, saw-like spines used for capturing plankton. On a historical side-note, the great appendages of A. canadensis, were originally discovered separate from the body due to decomposition before fossilization. As a result, the great appendages were originally described as completely separate organisms—specifically, a species of unusual shrimp (hence the name, Anomalocaris, which means “strange shrimp”.)
PINEAPPLE-RING MOUTH. The mouth of an anomalocarid is a ring formed from several wedge-shaped pieces. Like the great appendages, pineapple-ring mouth fossils were discovered before a complete specimen of the whole animal was known. Thus the mouth too was originally misidentified as an independent organism—a jellyfish called Peytoia.
SEGMENTED BODY WITH LATERAL FLAPS OR FINS FOR SWIMMING. Although researchers don’t know exactly how these fins moved in life, the most likely hypothesis is that they worked in a sequential sinusoidal motion like the wings of a stingray or the mantle of a squid or cuttlefish. 
Available from the artist [(Nocturnal Sea)] as print and as t-shirt … 

mucholderthen:

ANOMALOCARIDS  [Anomalocaridids]
Art and essay by John Meszaros

Anomalocarids are a group of (usually) predaceous arthropods found primarily in fossil beds of the Cambrian period.  

As more and more fossils are unearthed, the diversity of anomalocarids becomes increasingly clear.  

  • Some were the apex predator of their time,
  • others gentle plankton-skimmers,
  • some impaled actively swimming prey in the open water,
  • others probed for worms in the mud.

There are, however, a few features that unite them all:

  1. GREAT APPENDAGES: Anomalocarids possessed a pair of spiny, multi-jointed feeding appendages on the front of the head. There is considerable variation in size and structure of these limbs among the various species.
    For instance, the “classic” anomalocarid, A. canadensis (the one people usually think of when they picture anomalocarids) had long, robust limbs with multi-pronged spines for capturing prey.
    Laggania cambria, on the other hand, had stubbier appendages with long, delicate, saw-like spines used for capturing plankton.

    On a historical side-note, the great appendages of A. canadensis, were originally discovered separate from the body due to decomposition before fossilization. As a result, the great appendages were originally described as completely separate organisms—specifically, a species of unusual shrimp (hence the name, Anomalocaris, which means “strange shrimp”.)

  2. PINEAPPLE-RING MOUTH. The mouth of an anomalocarid is a ring formed from several wedge-shaped pieces. Like the great appendages, pineapple-ring mouth fossils were discovered before a complete specimen of the whole animal was known. Thus the mouth too was originally misidentified as an independent organism—a jellyfish called Peytoia.

  3. SEGMENTED BODY WITH LATERAL FLAPS OR FINS FOR SWIMMING. Although researchers don’t know exactly how these fins moved in life, the most likely hypothesis is that they worked in a sequential sinusoidal motion like the wings of a stingray or the mantle of a squid or cuttlefish.

Available from the artist [(Nocturnal Sea)] as print and as t-shirt … 

Apr 5 '13
nextian:

magpieandwhale:

nyctopterus:

Sinovenator changii was a little troodontid theropod from the Early Cretaceous of China. This very owly painting of it is totally not copied from this 1856 painting by William James Webbe.

Did you need some nightmare fuel tonight? I hope you did.

Nightmare fuel… or adorable duck owl dinosaur? Results are out.

nextian:

magpieandwhale:

nyctopterus:

Sinovenator changii was a little troodontid theropod from the Early Cretaceous of China. This very owly painting of it is totally not copied from this 1856 painting by William James Webbe.

Did you need some nightmare fuel tonight? I hope you did.

Nightmare fuel… or adorable duck owl dinosaur? Results are out.

Mar 27 '13
tiffanyillustration:

Pakicetus Inachus, the most basal whale species known so far.
This piece was displayed at the Games We Play show at Neito Fine Art in San Francisco, CA from March to April, 2011. Hopefully someone got all into prehistoric cetaceans from it! :B

tiffanyillustration:

Pakicetus Inachus, the most basal whale species known so far.

This piece was displayed at the Games We Play show at Neito Fine Art in San Francisco, CA from March to April, 2011. Hopefully someone got all into prehistoric cetaceans from it! :B