Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

whatever, dudes!!

I decided I wanted life to have some mystery.

Posts tagged science!

Sep 7 '14

(Source: protectcharles)

Aug 31 '14

skunkbear:

Have you heard of the mystery of the sailing stones? It’s not a Hardy Boys novel — it’s the strange phenomenon of rocks leaving zig-zagging tracks across Death Valley.

Well, they solved the mystery at last.

Image: Momatiuk - Eastcott/Corbis / Video: Jim Norris

Aug 6 '14

amnhnyc:

To form a picture of a particular pterosaur species, paleontologists must often gather information from several fossils, borrow details from living animals with similar ways of life, and draw conclusions from related pterosaurs that are better known. 

Learn more in Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs

Aug 2 '14
Jul 31 '14

third-eyes:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

Jul 27 '14
Jul 20 '14

policymic:

Paleontologists find bones from the largest creature to ever walk the Earth

A group of paleontologists in Argentina have discovered the remains of a dinosaur that makes Godzilla look like a bit of a wimp. The researchers found the fossilized bones of what’s believed to be the largest creature to have ever walked the Earth.

Based on the length and circumference of the dinosaur’s femur (thigh bone), the crew calculated the animal weighed 77 metric tons, seven more than the previous largest dinosaur record holder, the Argentinosaurus. The creature would have been roughly 130 feet long and 65 feet tall and is believed to have been a species titanosaur — an enormous herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period (about 100 to 60 million years ago) notable for their small heads, long necks and long tails. The team believes this creature likely lived in the forests of Patagonia between 95 and 100 million years ago, based on the age of the rocks in which its bones were found.

Read more | Follow policymic 

(Source: micdotcom)

Jun 24 '14
someauthorgirl:

xparrot:


The interval between the start and the end of “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” is 3 minutes and 30 seconds, and the International Space Station is moving is 7.66 km/s.
This means that if an astronaut on the ISS listens to “I’m Gonna Be”, in the time between the first beat of the song and the final lines …
… they will have traveled just about exactly 1,000 miles.

—What If: Orbital Speed

To be alive, now, in this age.

someauthorgirl:

xparrot:

The interval between the start and the end of “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)” is 3 minutes and 30 seconds, and the International Space Station is moving is 7.66 km/s.

This means that if an astronaut on the ISS listens to “I’m Gonna Be”, in the time between the first beat of the song and the final lines …

… they will have traveled just about exactly 1,000 miles.

What If: Orbital Speed

To be alive, now, in this age.

Jun 15 '14
derinthemadscientist:

sexkittenpurrs:

malevittus:

thefrozenrose:

veggielezzyfemmie:

It’s even cooler when you stand back and squint your eyes.

Or take your glasses off

or take your glasses off

The only pic that’s ever made me exercise

SCIENCE TIME (because I’ve seen some curious tags)
So your optic nerve (the bit that sends info from your eyes to your brain) can only send so much data at once. Because of this, it doesn’t send everything you see — just some vague outlines and colour areas and stuff — and your brain just sort of invents the rest. Normally this isn’t a problem, because the optic nerve sends new parts of the image constantly, and your brain just kind of assumes that the old info for the bits it’s not getting is still accurate. When you look at this image of legos, your brain sees legos, and you know from memory that they vaguely resemble a face.
But if you make your visions worse, make it so that you can’t see the legos… well, humans brains are really, really good at seeing faces. So the vague data from a clear image says ‘legos that kind of look like a face’, but if you take the legos away, the brain just says ‘face’, and fills in the expected details of the face. And that’s how your brain bullshitting you can lead to awesome optical illusions.
/SCIENCE TIME

derinthemadscientist:

sexkittenpurrs:

malevittus:

thefrozenrose:

veggielezzyfemmie:

It’s even cooler when you stand back and squint your eyes.

Or take your glasses off

or take your glasses off

The only pic that’s ever made me exercise

SCIENCE TIME (because I’ve seen some curious tags)

So your optic nerve (the bit that sends info from your eyes to your brain) can only send so much data at once. Because of this, it doesn’t send everything you see — just some vague outlines and colour areas and stuff — and your brain just sort of invents the rest. Normally this isn’t a problem, because the optic nerve sends new parts of the image constantly, and your brain just kind of assumes that the old info for the bits it’s not getting is still accurate. When you look at this image of legos, your brain sees legos, and you know from memory that they vaguely resemble a face.

But if you make your visions worse, make it so that you can’t see the legos… well, humans brains are really, really good at seeing faces. So the vague data from a clear image says ‘legos that kind of look like a face’, but if you take the legos away, the brain just says ‘face’, and fills in the expected details of the face. And that’s how your brain bullshitting you can lead to awesome optical illusions.

/SCIENCE TIME

May 30 '14
femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

 Sources:

1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424